Motor Oil & Lubricants

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  • Education/FAQs

How to Change Your Oil

Make your ride a well-oiled machine. Your engine has a ton of moving parts that all need to be “oiled up” so they can fire on all pistons (so to speak). That’s where PEAK comes into play—with every kind of oil and fluid known to man. But we don’t just supply quality products, we supply the “know-how” too. So take a ride down our DIY highway and learn how to always keep your fluids, well, fluid.

Get your flush on.

LUBE UP OR LOSE OUT.

Check out this quick clip and see how PEAK has made it super easy for you to change your motor oil—and keep your ride ridin’ high.

WATCH HOW
Get your flush on.

YOU’VE GOT QUESTIONS. WE’VE GOT ANSWERS.

Get the entire 4-1-1 on what makes PEAK Motor Oil a top-notch performer.

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Get your flush on.

PEAK'S LINE OF MOTOR OILS

A complete selection of Conventional, Synthetic, High-Mileage, 2-Cycle, and Heavy Duty multi-grade motor oils.

MOTOR OIL

FIND PEAK MOTOR OIL NEAR YOU!

FIND PEAK MOTOR OIL NEAR YOU!

FIND THE RIGHT PRODUCT FOR YOU VEHICLE'S YEAR, MAKE, AND MODEL

FIND THE RIGHT PRODUCT FOR YOU VEHICLE'S YEAR, MAKE, AND MODEL

LUBE UP OR LOSE OUT.

Grease monkey see, grease monkey do. Want a quick download of how motor oil goes to work—and how easy it is to change your car’s oil? Well, you’ve come to the right place.

HOW DO I
PEAK HOW-TO CHANGE YOUR MOTOR OIL

There are no stupid questions. Only stupid answers. But thankfully neither will be found here. Learn all you need to know—and a whole lot more—in this fun, super-informative Q&A.

Q:
Do I really need to change my oil every 3,000 miles?
 
A:

There’s a big misconception in the auto world that you “have to” change your oil every 3,000 miles. The fact of the matter is, with such technological advancements made in the formulation and engineering of motor oil, it’s nothing more than overkill. In fact, research has shown that it’s sometimes better to not change your oil every 3,000 miles—to give the current oil the proper amount of time to cycle through and work its magic. Sadly, the whole “3,000 miles or bust” mentality has turned into more of a marketing ploy by oil change chains. We do, however, always recommend checking with your owner’s manual for what your car’s manufacturer deems as the appropriate amount of time to go between oil changes.

Q:
Why does oil turn black when it's old?
 
A:

The short answer is: it turns black not as much because it’s old, but because it’s done its job and has collected all the gunk that can be harmful to your engine.

Q:
What's the difference between conventional, synthetic, and high-mileage oil?
 
A:

An entire book can be written on this topic, so we’ll keep it short and sweet. Basically, conventional oil is what should be used for everyday, “normal” driving. Conventional is designed to offer maximum protection throughout all seasons. Synthetic, on the other hand, has supplemental additives and higher levels of viscosity to protect your engine in harsh driving conditions and extreme temperatures. High-mileage oil, to put it simply, is a type of conventional oil; it’s just been engineered with premium base oils and enhanced additive systems to offer maximum protection on high-mileage engines. Fact is, a higher-mileage car has parts that are worn down and may not be as up to snuff as they once were, so high-mileage oil, with it’s added formulations and what not, help by giving even more life to an older engine.

Q:
What do the different motor oil weights (5W-30, 15W-40, etc.) mean?
 
A:

Oil weights are basically just a differentiation of viscosity (oil thickness) grades. Depending on the grade (5W-30, for example), indicates the level of thickness of the oil. Typically, thinner oils have lower numbers—and tend to flow easier—while higher numbers indicate thicker oils, which are typically more resistant to flow.

Q:
Why is it important to recycle oil—and how can I recycle mine after an oil change?
 
A:

Like aluminum cans—or anything else we recycle nowadays—recycling motor oil helps prevent pollution that can harm us all. With modern, innovative techniques, refineries are able to take crude oil and create basic lube stock that’s used to make motor oil. And with an excess of oil, thanks to the “3,000 mile oil change” myth, recycling oil is more important than ever. It helps the environment, after all. And it’s easy. Just take your used motor oil to participating auto parts stores, or search for a nearby oil recycling facility online.